Importance of Art

IMG-20150308-WA0011

History bears testimony to the fact that art plays a crucial role in life. Art is universal and is everywhere. We experience art on a daily basis from the houses we live in, to the movies we see and to the books that we read. It expresses ideas beliefs in more than one way. It can record the experiences of people. Art pieces have given historians valuable information about the standards of beauty, fashion, society and beliefs of the artist’s time. They can also make statements and provoke serious thought about the current issues. Art immortalizes people, places and events, clearly evident in our vast treasure of paintings and sculptures. A very famous example, are the enchanting frescos depicting life of Lord Buddha at the Ajanta caves.

The critically important role of art in the academy, as in life, is to enable us to see the world and the human condition differently, and in seeing the world through a particular work of art, to see a truth we might not have understood before. Imagination and a sense of discovery are often as important as knowledge. Composing a song, writing a play, creating a painting, or writing a poem forces us to think in alternative ways, to hold different assumptions and to entertain different and often more instructive ways of making connections and ways of looking at all that surrounds us. A good artist advances culture and civilization by provoking thought, introspection, and discussion.

Art can be a key to a child’s mind. Art, being a natural expression, gives children an easy and smooth outlet to express their emotions, ideas and thoughts. Plenty of therapists recommend art as a form of therapy to help children open up and to build self-confidence. It also lends itself to physical development and enhancement of fine and gross motor skills. Children should be encouraged to play and connect with colours and enjoy the radiance of life and hence celebrate their childhood.

Art is a great medium of meditation. Great art can invoke many positive mind states in a viewer. It can ease stress and renew energy. Each time we look at a painting or a sculpture, or watch a good play or movie, of listen to a certain music, it connects us to emotions and inspires us to dive deep within. In this way art can serve as a catharsis, or help us uncover feelings of which we were previously unaware. Colours used on the canvas can bring colour and brightness to our otherwise mechanical and mundane lives. Art makes people happy and happiness is what we all strive for.

 

Suguna Salhotra

 

KLF

KLF logo

KLF is the first annual retreat literary festival of the country. A not for profit initiative, KLF will bring together top authors, thought leaders and opinion makers of the country in Dhanachuli, an enchanting little village in the Himalayas. Blessed with pleasant weather, breathtaking views of the Himalayas, lush forests, enticing fruit orchards and charming people, Dhanachuli is a beautiful weekend getaway from Delhi.

The festival is conceptualised as an innovative and unusual event where rich and deeper discussions will be held over 5 days yet leaving adequate time for participants to laze, go for a picnic, village walk or spend time with children from local schools who are fond of their books. The objective is to facilitate building bond among members of the literary and related community, create associations that will graduate to mentorship.

KLF is planned as deep in content- high in profile and spectacular in format – an experiential and impressionable festival. KLF will invoke emotions as much as thoughts.

About the Founder

Sumant is a corporate and policy lawyer of global eminence; writer, poet, museum curator and a creative entrepreneur. He has founded a number of initiatives to promote art, culture, literature and music. He is founder of a boutique hotel (Te Aroha), a museum (Chitrashala) and a production house (The Speaking Hats).

He is senior international consultant to IMF, World Bank Group and OECD, has worked extensively on policy matters in Africa, Eastern Europe, Middle East and South Asia. Rated as India’s No. 1 insolvency lawyer by Legal 500, his contributions to reforms in Indian insolvency system are well-recognised. Sumant has held leadership positions in prestigious multi-lateral, global and national organisations.

He is a frequent speaker at various international and domestic conferences.

Sumant lives in New Delhi with his wife, Asha and two children.

Teamwork Arts

About Teamwork Arts

teamwork-arts

For over 24 years, Teamwork has presented the finest of Indian performers, writers and visual artists to the world and our own nation.

Every year, we produce 21 performing and visual arts and literary festivals in 11 countries, including Australia, Canada, Egypt, Germany, France, Hong Kong, Israel, Scotland, Singapore, South Africa, Spain and USA.

Teamwork produces one of the world’s largest literary gatherings, the annual ZEE Jaipur Literature Festival. Our musical extravaganza, Bollywood Love Story – A Musical, continues to tour the world and has had sold out shows in Austria, Germany, Netherlands, South Africa, Spain and Switzerland. Our International festivals in India have included the bi annual Bonjour India, festival of France with more than 200 events across 18 cities in India and featuring over 250 artists, designers, researchers & entrepreneurs, and OZ fest- a festival of Australia in India.

 

About The ZEE Jaipur Literature Festival

The ZEE Jaipur Literature Festival is the world’s largest free literary festival, celebrating national and international writers, and encompassing a range of interests including film, music and theatre. The festival has already hosted some of the best-known national and international writers including Orhan Pamuk, J.M. Coetzee, John Berendt, Kiran Desai, Christopher Hampton, Ian McEwan, Vikram Seth, Wole Soyinka, Salman Rushdie, Pico Iyer, Simon Schama, Thomas Keneally, Hanif Kureishi, Vikram Chandra, Anoushka Shankar, Michael Frayn, Stephen Frears, Alexander McCall Smith, Donna Tartt, Tina Brown, Shashi Tharoor, Mohammed Hanif, Paul Zacharia, among many others. The Directors of the ZEE Jaipur Literature Festival are William Dalrymple and Namita Gokhale and the festival is produced by Sanjoy K. Roy and Sheuli Sethi of Teamwork Arts. The Festival’s Title Sponsor is ZEE Entertainment.

 

 

Butterfly and Bee

Butterfly and The Bee

Butterfly & The Bee …your literary angels is a hub for all authors/readers/writers/publishers. We are a platform that acts as a bridge for authors/readers/writers so they can meet, greet, promote their work and mingle within the Indian literary Circle. We invite authors and writers to showcase their talents and achievements. We are here to make ‘You’ Authors, Writers and more, shine like Superstars. We also provide avenues to publishers and literary agencies to find new talents and connect with writers and authors. For our readers, we give you an opportunity to enjoy the experience of book reading like never before and become a part of the largest network of the literary world.

Why Butterfly & The Bee…

When it comes to words like – calm, balanced, inspiring, clarity, gentleness, excitability, flexibility, beautiful, vibrant …We can easily relate them to Butterflies.

And what about Bee? …Well as Bee ripens honey rapidly …we are here to help authors ripen rapidly and make their presence felt in the Indian Literary World and also turn them into celebrities …our superstars.

 * * * * *

 Sumit Sehgal (Director / Founder) – A professional writer with more than five years of experience in the field of creative writing. Experience in strategic brainstorming, campaign developments, project designing and execution with collaborative team of designers, copywriters, informative architects, content analysts and other production specialist, to make projects a huge success! Sumit being involved in theatre work also has expertise in different writing styles and poetry with a twist.

 

Harvesting Habits Holistically: A Viewpoint

habits wordle

By Parambir Kaur, Souradeep Roy, Amritbir Kaur

Editor’s Note: We are all tied down due to some of our habits. We might be the slave of a few of them while we tend to avoid getting drawn into this quicksand.                   

 

THE EVER-REFLECTIVE HABITS                                              

By Parambir Kaur             

          “Oh! I really cannot stop taking tea even if my doctor has strictly advised me against doing so,” exclaimed a friend at a get-together. Now one would say that the speaker has become a slave of his\her habit. Basically someone’s personality is nothing but only a sum total of a handful of habits, some of which one might have inherited and the rest may have been developed intentionally or according to need. And on account of these very habits each human being is different from the other. One can say that these habits determine the quality of one’s life to a great extent. They also ensure the kind of image a person will have in society. The way one talks, one’s choice of words ; the manner in which one conducts oneself on different occasions; the kind of food one eats and the way one eats it; the colours and  style of dress are all, an expression of one’s habits and reflect one’s personality. Even our thought process is influenced by our habits. A deliberate effort has to be made on regular basis, to train one’s mind to concentrate only on the positive beliefs.

Then there are good and bad habits. As a human being is the topmost among the living beings on this earth, it is quite expected that instead of becoming a slave to one’s habits, one should rather govern them. Even otherwise acquiring too many habits tends to make life dull, mechanical and monotonous. Only such a practice deserves to be turned into a habit, the results of which are bound to be positive. When one finds that some habit is doing more harm than good to one’s disposition, there is no reason why one cannot get rid of it gradually, with consistent and conscious effort. And such a being ends up becoming a motivation source for one’s fellow beings, therefore improving the standard of society unknowingly. Taking out some time on daily basis to praise and confer with God is one of the most rewarding habits.

There also comes a time when some practices, instead of remaining merely habits, turn into principles and come to be known as the hallmark of someone’s temperament. Being flexible and able to change one’s behaviour, according to the need of the hour, is a sign of wisdom and maturity. This makes life interesting, boosts morale and eventually paves way for success. The American social writer and philosopher, Eric Hoffer has averred, “Wise living consists perhaps less in acquiring good habits than in acquiring as few habits as possible.”

THE OTHER SIDE   

By Souradeep Roy

          Another school of thought would contend that habits cannot be placed in the category of good or bad. Waking up every day is a habit we all possess. These can be called involuntary habits, that is, habits we all adhere to every day such as the basic act of waking up or sleeping. These habits are essential in the way they regulate the proper functioning of the metabolism of the body. However, in a larger sense, almost everything that we do every day in our lives is involuntary as we are all fashioned to live in a certain way. Modern society in Albert Camus’ opinion is “Rising, tram, four hours in the office or factory, meal, tram, four hours of work, meal, sleep, and Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, according to the same rhythm – this path is easily followed most of the time.” Thus this routine is but another substitute for habit – the habit of living. This kind of a habit of living in the same dull repetitive existence is neither good nor bad. It is a condition of living, and worse, it cannot be altered. It is a common phenomenon to experience the need of a ‘break’, which sometimes comes in the form of a holiday or sometimes just in the form of a good get-together. What we try to achieve through this is an escape from the habit of living the same kind of life. But such attempts offer only a temporary solution to the larger question of escaping the clutches of a routine. For most, the repetition of everyday events is the bane of living. The first step towards finding a solution to such a situation is the realization that we are after all in a habit of living in a ‘chain of daily gestures’ (Camus). The only solution is in the realization itself because we cannot but feel that no matter how much we would like to, we cannot completely alter the monotony of our lives. The only respite, in such a situation, is in realizing that living life itself is a habit. (This opinion of our everyday life becoming a habit is drawn from Camus’ view of existentialism, a view that finds its complete expression in The Myth of Sisyphus.)

 

SELF-DISCIPLINE

By Amritbir Kaur

Harry S. Truman, the former American President, once remarked: “In reading the lives of great men, I found that the first victory they won was over themselves…self-discipline with all of them came first.”

With a view to inculcate a sense of self-discipline the authority must be in some or the other way invested in the students. This will help to serve many purposes – it makes the child more responsible towards his duties, makes the process of administration a bit more democratic and also inculcates a sense of pride among the students in their being able to contribute towards the management of the institution. Self discipline is something we all need because it is a vital characteristic of successful people. Why? Because nothing is as easy as it seems. There are always unforeseen challenges and problems on the path to success and achievement. To beat these you must persevere and be strong. Likewise, eating disorders or other problems associated with excess (such as smoking or alcoholism) require will power.

Excessive habits foster low self esteem and lack of self confidence. If you suffer from an obsession and cannot control it, you may blame or punish yourself. Likewise the reverse is also true. Low self esteem may cause some of these problems (eating too much, too little, binging or other damaging disorders), this is a vicious circle.

Self discipline helps you control your actions and make sure you stay on track. It is helpful if you suffer disorders like those mentioned above and need to break out and cure yourself. Please make use of help from friends or counsellors as this will support you in your efforts. Going it alone is very difficult!

 

A DOORBELL

By Souradeep Roy

Tell me, tell me, what is this ordinary?

Where can I find it?

Is it there in my fixed fingers

holding a toothbrush

which sweeps my teeth everyday?

Is it there in my gait

when I walk directionless

towards my college?

Is it there in my pen

which fills white sheets

with utter gibberish?

 

Tell me, tell me, where is this ordinary?

Is it there in the makeshift bus-stop

where I stretch my hand daily?

Is it there in the concern

of a million

over how I became so tall?

Is it there in the hot vapour

of the morning tea

which mixes into the air suddenly?

 

Tell me; tell me more about the ordinary.

Teach me to be concerned

about how I look,

how I dress,

how I speak,

or rather,

how well I look,

how well I dress,

how well I speak.

 

Better still,

create a map of my footsteps

I should tread

from home to school,

from school to college,

from college to office,

from office to the market

and finally back home.

 

Just keep this one request:

don’t stare at me,surprised

after you hear the doorbell.